fbpx
Can a Non-Citizen or Foreigner Invest in the U.S.?

Can a Non-Citizen or Foreigner Invest in the U.S.?

Are you a non-resident alien or non-U.S. citizen looking to invest in the U.S.? If you are, you might be wondering if it’s even possible to invest in the U.S. as a foreigner. 

Whether you’re part of a cross-border family or simply a non-U.S. citizen trying to invest in the U.S., there are quite a few myths and misconceptions about doing so as a non-American. We haven’t touched on this subject before, but we’ve still had a recent deluge of inquiries about investing in the U.S. as a foreigner. So we thought it was time to cover this subject more in-depth in what’s likely to be a multi-part series on the podcast.

In this episode, Keith Poniewaz, Ph.D.; Stan Farmer, CFP®, J.D.; and Syl Michelin cover the background on the topic and dive into the complications of investing in the U.S. as a non-American from both an inheritance perspective and income tax perspective. And when you’re investing abroad, the situs of the assets is critical. Simply put, the situs is the jurisdiction where property belongs for legal or tax purposes – in this case, the assets in which you’re investing. Keith, Stan and Syl define U.S. situs assets and non-U.S. situs assets, and how the situs status can impact your portfolio.

Questions about investing in the U.S. as a non-U.S. citizen or nonresident alien? Send them to us, and we might feature them on a future episode of the podcast. You can also reach out to our team and speak directly with an advisor by tapping the buttons below. 

PODCAST: 2021 Q3 Market Recap

PODCAST: 2021 Q3 Market Recap

Walkner Condon’s Syl Michelin, a Chartered Financial Analyst, is joined by Stan Farmer, CFP®, J.D., and Walkner Condon co-founder Clint Walkner to break down the most recent quarter of 2021 and look ahead to the final quarter of the year. (Where did the time go in 2021?)

The three discuss a somewhat turbulent last three months – at least, more so than we’ve seen since 2020 – how September has a reputation for being the worst month for the S&P historically (although you can’t game it, as Clint reminds us), and more. 

PODCAST: 2021 Q2 Market Recap

PODCAST: 2021 Q2 Market Recap

Clint Walkner teams up with two of Walkner Condon’s U.S. expat financial advisors Syl Michelin, a Chartered Financial Analyst®, and Stan Farmer, CFP®, to discuss the second quarter and look ahead to Q3 of 2021.

In another good quarter that has seen the S&P hover around all-time highs, things started rather uneventfully but then changed in June, as the tech sector got its groove back. The trio takes a trip down memory lane, framing the current tech atmosphere in terms of the late 90s and early 2000s, including a comparison between the Bulletin Board System of internet yesteryear and the new age, the Wall Street Bets subreddit. They also pose and explore the perplexing question related to the valuation spread in the S&P 500 and finish by revealing their favorite trend to watch – meme stocks or cryptocurrency?  

SPOTIFY

APPLE PODCASTS

The Past, Present, and Future of Taxable Investing

The Past, Present, and Future of Taxable Investing

Clint Walkner and Keith Poniewaz discuss investing in taxable accounts. They explore the history of investing, which started with the purchase of individual stocks by investors and then the development of mutual funds, which collectively helped pool risk and provide greater diversification. As index fund popularity grew, exchange-traded funds (ETFs) have grown significantly in popularity. As we look towards the future, are we looking at once again buying a large basket of individual stocks to manage taxation and risk? Clint and Keith discuss the new trend of “direct indexing”. Click here to listen to the podcast.

Potential Pitfalls for Expat Investing

Potential Pitfalls for Expat Investing

On our podcast, Keith and Clint discuss the intricacies of international investing and the potential pitfalls one might face as an expat investor. Investing internationally may involve currency risk, limited access to investments, and problems with opening accounts in certain countries.